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Jul 5
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Reader unquietcode asks:

I saw this post recently and it made me wonder what’s going on. If you look in the upper right of the frame as the camera submerges, you can see a little vortex of water whirring about. Even with the awesome power of the wave rolling forward a little tornado of water seems able to stably form. Any idea what causes this phenomenon?

This awesome clip was taken from John John Florence’s "& Again" surf video. What you’re seeing is the vortex motion of a plunging breaking wave. As ocean waves approach the shore, the water depth decreases, which amplifies the wave’s height. When the wave reaches a critical height, it breaks and begins to lose its energy to turbulence. There are multiple kinds of breaking waves, but plungers are the classic surfer’s wave. These waves become steep enough that the top of the wave  overturns and plunges into the water ahead of the wave. This generates the vortex-like tube you see in the animation. Such waves can produce complicated three-dimensional vortex structures like those seen in this video by Clark Little. Any initial variation in the main vortex gets stretched as the wave rolls on, and this spins up and strengthens the rib vortices seen wrapped around the primary vortex. (Source video: B. Kueny and J. Florence)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Reader unquietcode asks:

I saw this post recently and it made me wonder what’s going on. If you look in the upper right of the frame as the camera submerges, you can see a little vortex of water whirring about. Even with the awesome power of the wave rolling forward a little tornado of water seems able to stably form. Any idea what causes this phenomenon?

This awesome clip was taken from John John Florence’s "& Again" surf video. What you’re seeing is the vortex motion of a plunging breaking wave. As ocean waves approach the shore, the water depth decreases, which amplifies the wave’s height. When the wave reaches a critical height, it breaks and begins to lose its energy to turbulence. There are multiple kinds of breaking waves, but plungers are the classic surfer’s wave. These waves become steep enough that the top of the wave  overturns and plunges into the water ahead of the wave. This generates the vortex-like tube you see in the animation. Such waves can produce complicated three-dimensional vortex structures like those seen in this video by Clark Little. Any initial variation in the main vortex gets stretched as the wave rolls on, and this spins up and strengthens the rib vortices seen wrapped around the primary vortex. (Source video: B. Kueny and J. Florence)

hitrecord:

“Folded Landscape”

hitrecord:

Folded Landscape

comedycentral:

Click here to watch more of Jordan Klepper and Jessica Williams’s safety tips for college students from last night’s Daily Show.

metricmusic:

Got false lights for the sun.

metricmusic:

Got false lights for the sun.

smartgirlsattheparty:

huffingtonpost:

People have offered many potential explanations for this discrepancy, but this ad highlights the importance of the social cues that push girls away from math and science in their earliest childhood years.

Watch the powerful Verizon advertisement to really understand what a little girl hears when you tell her she’s pretty.

:)

(Source: youtube.com)

georgetakei:

The gay agenda, folks. Fear it. http://ift.tt/1qV6ZcF

georgetakei:

The gay agenda, folks. Fear it. http://ift.tt/1qV6ZcF

May 2
newwavefeminism:

thenationmagazine:

One step closer to a living wage for all Americans! 

Remember, think about the QUALITY that the wage increase brings to those working in low-wage jobs, especially factoring cost-of-living for those areas. I hope this doesn’t turn into a focus on the QUANTITY of how many areas can jump on the wage increase bandwagon by adding a few dollars and cents to their minimum wage and calling it a day.Progress is progress but means, equity and intentions are important as well.

newwavefeminism:

thenationmagazine:

One step closer to a living wage for all Americans! 

Remember, think about the QUALITY that the wage increase brings to those working in low-wage jobs, especially factoring cost-of-living for those areas. I hope this doesn’t turn into a focus on the QUANTITY of how many areas can jump on the wage increase bandwagon by adding a few dollars and cents to their minimum wage and calling it a day.

Progress is progress but means, equity and intentions are important as well.

weneeddiversebooks:

We exist - so what’s taking so long? #weneeddiversebooks @bloodorangepress @j9macbeth

weneeddiversebooks:

We exist - so what’s taking so long? #weneeddiversebooks @bloodorangepress @j9macbeth

May 1

policymic:

policymic:

10 crucial life lessons of ‘Mean Girls’

It’s been 10 years since the classic teen movie Mean Girls hit the silver screen and a generation of young women started quoting the movie’s dialogue line-by-line. The film has become iconic for its golden comedic screenplay, written by the talented Tina Fey, and its realistic take on high school drama. From backstabbing popular girls to the art-nerd revenge, Mean Girls’ characters taught female movie-watchers more serious life lessons about high school, Girl World and womanhood than might immediately meet the eye.

Read the full list | Follow policymic

Mean Girls' was released April 30th, 2004, exactly 10 years ago today. Here's to 10 more fetch years.

(Source: micdotcom)

Apr 5

What constitutes “chilling” behavior? A teacher calls on the boys in class more than the girls. A CEO ignores what a woman says in a meeting but listens intently when a man makes the exact same point. A conference emcee mentions a female speaker’s appearance rather than (or in addition to) her accomplishments, but feels no need to comment on the appearance of male speakers. A guy at an atheist/skeptics meeting hits on a young woman in an elevator at 4 AM, ignoring the fact that she just spent the evening talking about how she hates being objectified at such gatherings.

All these sorts of things seem tiny and insignificant by themselves, but they add up, and this produces a cumulative “chilling” effect that makes women feel unwelcome, like they don’t belong. That’s a “chilly climate.” The effect is subtle; sometimes we’re not even consciously aware of it. We just have that nagging feeling of being “less than,” unable to put our finger on why we feel that way.

- http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/cocktail-party-physics/2011/07/20/is-it-cold-in-here/ (via amelie-anomaly)